UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

The conditions to be met by a student in order to obtain a degree are those defined by the program in the academic year in which the student entered the Department.

1. For those students who entered the Department before and including the 2009-10 academic year, the following are necessary to earn a degree:

  • Students must pass the 23 required courses with a total of 181 ECTS credits.
  • Students must complete an Undergraduate Thesis, which has 12 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass at least 9 elective courses with a total of at least 47 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass the “Learning to Use Computers” course.

2. For those students who entered the Department in the 2010-11 and the 2011-12 academic years, the following are necessary to earn a degree:

  • Students must pass the 23 required courses with a total of 181 ECTS credits.
  • Students must complete an Undergraduate Thesis, which has 12 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass at least 9 elective courses with a total of at least 47 ECTS credits.
  • Students must earn a total number of at least 240 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass the “Learning to Use Computers” course.

3. For those students who entered the Department in the 2012-13 and the 2013-14 academic years, the following are necessary to earn a degree:

  • Students must pass the 23 required lecture courses and the 8 required laboratory courses for a total of 181 ECTS credits.
  • Students must complete an Undergraduate Thesis, which has 12 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass at least 9 elective courses with a total of at least 47 ECTS credits.
  • Students must earn a total number of at least 240 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass the “Learning to Use Computers” course.

4. For those students who entered the Department in the 2014-15 academic year and thereafter, the following are necessary to earn a degree:

  • Students must pass the 22 required lecture courses and the 8 required laboratory courses for a total of 179 ECTS credits.
  • Students must complete an Undergraduate Thesis, which has 14 ECTS credits.
  • Students must pass at least 9 elective courses with a total of at least 47 ECTS credits.
  • Students must earn a total number of at least 240 ECTS credits.

Note:

Additional information (e.g. Study Regulations, Instructors, Program) may be found in the Annual Edition of the Undergraduate Curriculum of the Department.

1st Semester
 
101. PHYSICS I (required, 4 lecture hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM230/

Course content: Introduction, mathematical introduction to physics. Measurements and units. Statics. Forces. Kinematics. Relative motion. Rigid body dynamics. Work. Energy. Many-body dynamics. Dynamics of solids. Oscillations. Fluid dynamics. Geometric optics.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “University Physics Vol.1” H.Young, R. Freedman, Papazisis Publ. 2) “Physics, Vol I”. D. Halliday, R. Resnik, J. Walker, Dardanos and Co. Publ.

 
104. MATHEMATICS I (required, 6 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 10 ECTS credits)

Course Website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/MATH440

Course content: Real numbers. Functions. Sequences and series of real numbers. Real functions of a single variable: limits, continuity, derivative, integral, function investigation. Differential equations. Linear first order differential equations. Bernoulli differential equations. Linear second order differential equations with constant coefficients. General solution of general second order differential equations. Method of indeterminate coefficients. Introduction to Rn space. Many variable functions. Limits. Continuity. Partial derivatives. Slope. Directional derivative. Critical points. Second order partial derivatives. Hessian matrix. Local extrema. Critical point criteria. Double integrals, polar transformation, change of integration order. Triple integrals, cylindrical transformation. Line integrals of first and second kind. Applications: Calculation of work in a vector field. Vector analysis (differential operators). Green’s theorem.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “General Mathematics, Vol. I (Calculus)”, C. E. Athanasiadis, E.M. Giannakoulias, S.C. Giotopoulos, Symmetria Publ., Athens 2009 2) “Applied Calculus” L. N. Tsitsas, Symmetria Publ., Athens 2003 3) “Calculus Vol Ι”, R. Finey, M. Weir, F. Gior­da­no, University of Crete Publ, Heraklion 2005 4) “Differential Equations”, C. E. Athanasiadis

 
113. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING – APPLICATIONS IN CHEMISTRY (required, 2 lecture hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/2 weeks, 5 ECTS credits)

Course Website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM206

Course content: Description of PCs and operational systems. System security. Internet search for retrieval of scientific information. Chemistry journals and scientific databases. Word processing. Excel. Plots and graphs. Chemical drawing and simulation software. Applications in Chemistry. Short introduction to programming and to logical diagrams.
Laboratory course content: Word processing and mathematical formulae. Creation of presentations. Use of chemical drawing software. Internet search for retrieval of scientific information. Information retrieval from chemistry journals and scientific databases. Introduction to Microsoft Excel, input of data in worksheets, data types, functions, data filtering and sorting, graphs and printing. Creation of molecular structure files through internal and Cartesian coordinates and computer imaging.

Laboratory course content: Word processing and mathematical formulae. Creation of presentations. Use of chemical drawing software. Internet search for retrieval of scientific information. Information retrieval from chemistry journals and scientific databases. Introduction to Microsoft Excel, input of data in worksheets, data types, functions, data filtering and sorting, graphs and printing. Creation of molecular structure files through internal and Cartesian coordinates and computer imaging.

Course materials in Greek: 1) Step by Step 7 in 1 WINDOWS 10-OFFICE 2016, M. Glava, DISIGMA PUBLICATIONS, 2018 2) Instructor’s notes.

 
133. GENERAL AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Ι (required, 5 lecture hours/week, 4 laboratory hours/week, 10 ECTS credits)

Course Website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM109

Course content: Atoms. The periodic system. Chemical bonds. Molecules: Molecular shape, interactions between molecules, states of matter. Chemical equilibrium. Chemical thermodynamics. Chemical kinetics. Reaction mechanisms. Solutions. Acids, bases and ions in aqueous solution. Redox reactions: Reduction and Oxidation, The diagrammatic presentation of potential data (Latimer, Frost and pH dependence diagrams).

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Basic Principles of Inorganic Chemistry”, G. Pneumatikakis, C. A. Mitsopoulou, C. Methenitis ed. UNIBOOK IKE, Athens 2006. 2) Basic General Chemistry, Cotton, Wilkinson, Gauss, 3rd edition, translated in Greek, ed. Parisianou, 2015, 3) General Chemistry (10th International Edition)», Darrell Ebbing, Steven Gaummon, translated in Greek (ed. Travlos & Co Ο.Ε.) 2014.

Laboratory website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM246

Laboratory course content: Basic laboratory techniques. Solubility studies. Apparent degree of dissociation. Chemical balance of inorganic systems (A). pH – buffers. Determination of pKa. Heat of chemical reactions. Redox reactions. Principles of chemical kinetics. Synthesis of metal complexes. Lambert-Beer law. Job’s continuous variation method.

Grading policy: The grade is determined from: a) The diligent and successful execution of the experiments. – Oral or written examinations in the exercise of the day. b) The way of presenting and evaluating the experimental results in the laboratory notebook. c) From the average of the two exams during the semester. The first exam examines the content of the first five laboratory exercises and is given immediately after their completion, and the second is the content of the remaining five. The grade of the laboratory is calculated as follows:

{0.3 × points [(a) + (b)]: 2} + {0.7 × grade (c)}

If the student has completed the laboratory part of the exercises but has a laboratory grade of less than 5, then she/he is allowed to take part in an examination in September. In the case of laboratory examination failure, then the student must re-register for the course and re-take the written semester exams. There is no examination during the January-February examination period.

Course materials in Greek:  “Laboratory Exercises of General and Inorganic Chemistry” C. Mitsopoulou, K. Methenitis, A. Karaliota, M. Paparigopoulou, D. Stambaki, I. Markopoulos, P. Kyritsis, N. Psaroudakis, G. Kalatzis (UNIBOOKS IKE) 2005.


 

2nd Semester
 
201. PHYSICS II (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/PHYS237/

Course content: Electric fields. Gauss’s Law. Electric potential. Capacitance and dielectrics. Electric current and resistance. Direct current circuits. Magnetic fields. Magnetic fields sources. Faraday’s law. Induction. Alternating current circuits. The nature of light and geometric optics laws. Picture composition. Electromagnetic wave interference. Diffraction and polarization.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “University Physics Vol. 2” H.Young, R. Freedman, Papazisis Publ. 2) “Physics, Vol ΙΙ”. D. Halliday, R. Resnik, J. Walker, Dardanos and Co. Publ.

 
205. MATHEMATICS ΙΙ (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: –

Course content: Vector spaces. Matrices. Determinants. Linear systems, linear mapping, characteristics of operators and matrices (eigenvectors, eigenvalues, eigenspaces, etc.). Matrix diagonalization. Elements of vector analysis. Plane geometry (perpendicular line, change of coordinates, conic sections, tangent). Three dimensional geometry (straight line, plane, standard surfaces), inner product vector spaces, orthogonality. Examples and problems.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Linear Algebra and Analytical Geometry”, A. Chrysakis 2) “Linear Algebra”, A. Fellouris

 
213. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY  (required, 5 hours/week, 8 laboratory hours/week, 13 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM164/

Course content: Introduction to Analytical Chemistry, Solutions, Concentration units. Errors and Statistical Treatment of Analytical results. Equilibria of weak acids and bases. Water ionization, pH. Volumetric analysis, titration errors. Acid-base titrations. Oxidation – reduction equilibria, redox titrations. Equilibria of insoluble compounds, solubility product. Gravimetric analysis, Precipitation titrations. Complex formation and equilibria. Complexation titrations. Titrations in non-aqueous solutions. Application of volumetric analysis, Organic analysis.

Course materials in Greek: 1) e-book “Analytical Chemistry”, A. Calokerinos, 2) “Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry”, Skoog, West, Holler, Crouch.

Laboratory course content: Introduction to qualitative analysis of cations and anions. Characteristic reactions of selected cations and anions. Qualitative analysis of solids and alloys. Introduction to quantitative analysis. Primary and secondary standard solutions. Applications of acid-base titrations, redox titrations, precipitation titrations and complexometric titrations. Organic analysis.

Grading policy: At regular intervals during laboratory courses, two (2) compulsory written examinations take place which result in an average grade (A). In addition, the “laboratory performance” of each student is evaluated by the instructor of each laboratory team for a second grade (B), taking into account (i) the careful and successful completion of laboratory experiments, and (ii) the critical presentation and evaluation of experimental results. Both grades should be ≥5/10. The final Laboratory Grade is calculated by the formula: (A+B)/2. Students, who have completed successfully all the laboratory experiments but fail to achieve passing grades, have the possibility to participate in an examination during September exams.

Course materials in Greek: Instructors’ laboratory notes.

 
232Θ. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY ΙΙ (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 5 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM110/

Course content: Main Group Chemistry. Hydrogen. Noble Gases. Halogens. Oxygen group. Nitrogen group. Carbon group. Boron group. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals. Zinc, Cadmium, Mercury. Lanthanides and Actinides. Properties and Periodic trends of the elements and their compounds (structure, substitution, physical and chemical properties). Inorganic Chemical Technology. Applications to Materials, Catalysis, Energy, Organometallic and Bioinorganic chemistry.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Inorganic Chemistry – The Elements” D. Katakis, K. Methenitis, C. Mitsopoulou, G. Pneumatikakis (Ed. Papazisis SA) Athens, 2002. 2) “Special Inorganic Chemistry – Chemical Elements and Compounds” P. P. Karagiannidis (Ed. Ziti Pelagia & SIA OE) 4th Ed., Thessaloniki, 2009.

 
232Π. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY ΙΙ (required, 0 hours/week, 4 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Laboratory website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM256/

Prerequisites: Completed successfully General and Inorganic Chemistry I – Laboratory

Course content: Halogens. Group 2. Preparation of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 (Solvay method). Periodic Table – Oxides and their Properties. Isolation of Metals from their Ores. Electrical Conductivity: Calculation of Salt Index of Soils. Literature Search – Report – Presentation: Topics in the area of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology are assigned to groups of 5-6 students at the beginning of the semester. Groups work independently throughout the semester to collect relevant literature, and to prepare written reports and a PowerPoint presentation on their assigned topics. Students learn how to use library resources, on-line reference databases (ISI-WoS, Scopus etc.), and relevant software (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, ISIS-DRAW, CHEMDRAW, ACD/ChemSketch, etc.). Oral presentations of the assigned topics at the end of the semester are mandatory and comprise an integral part of the grade. On-site visits to local industry: if time permits, such on-site visits are organized towards the end of the semester.

Grading policy: The Laboratory grade is calculated as follows:

{0.05 × grades [(a)+(b)]/2} + {0.25 × grade (c)} + {0.7 × grade (d)},

where grades (a) and (b) are given as in “General and Inorganic Chemistry I – Laboratory”, grade (c) is assigned to the report and the oral presentation, and grade (d) is the result of the final comprehensive written laboratory exam. There is no examination during the June exams.

Course material in Greek: “Laboratory Exercises in Inorganic Chemistry II” C. Mitsopoulou, K. Methenitis, A. Lymperopoulou-Karaliota, P. Paraskevopoulou, student’s laboratory companion.


 

3rd Semester
 
313. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS I (required, 4 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM100/

Prerequisites: Analytical Chemistry laboratory (213Π).

Content: Introduction to instrumental analysis. Methods of quantification (calibration plots, standard additions, internal standard). Method of least squares. Electrochemical cells (galvanic, electrolytic). Potentiometry (reference electrodes, indicator electrodes, membrane electrodes). Ion selective electrodes. pH measurements. Applications to inorganic and inorganic analysis. Electrolytic techniques. Electrode polarization. Electrogravimetric analysis. Coulometry. Voltammetry (polarography, stripping techniques, cyclic voltammetry). Amperometry (amperometric titrations, flow detectors). Introduction to separations. Separation errors. Two-phase equilibria. Extraction. Craig extraction. Specific reagents for separations by extraction. Solid phase extraction. Ion-exchange resins. Introduction to chromatography, basic principles and terminology. Gas chromatography, instrumentation and applications.

Laboratory course: Electrogravimetric and coulometric determinations, applications of ion selective electrodes, potentiometric titrations, polarographic analysis, stripping voltammetry, extraction, gas chromatographic analysis

Grading policy: One examination (theoretical and practical questions). The Laboratory grade counts for 30% of the final grade.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry”, Skoog, West, Holler, Crouch 2) Instrumental Analysis Th.P. Chatziioannou, M. Koupparis.

 
323. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Ι (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits )

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM108/

Course content: “A Review of General Chemistry: Electrons, Bonds and Molecular Properties, Molecular Representations, Acids and Bases, Alkanes and Cycloalkanes, Stereoisomerism, Chemical reactivity and Mechanisms, Substitution Reactions, Alkenes: Structure and Preparation via Elimination Reactions, Addition Reactions of Alkenes, Alkynes, Radical reactions, Synthesis.”

Course materials in Greek: «Organic Chemistry vol. Ι», David Klein, Translated in Greek, Utopia Publishing, Athens, 2015.

 
332. SPECTROSCOPY IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (required, 3 hours/week, 4 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/CHEM231

Course content: Introduction to molecular symmetry: point groups, group representation, Group Theory. Electronic structure of the free atoms: electronic representations, spectroscopic terms, energy states. Atomic Spectroscopy – Zeeman effect. Molecular spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectroscopies. Elementary study of the harmonic oscillator. Determination of the number and the symmetries of the IR and Raman active vibrations. Characteristic group frequencies. Introduction to NMR spectroscopy. 1D NMR spectra. Decoupling. Intramolecular and intermolecular exchange.

Course materials in Greek: “Topics in Inorganic Chemistry – Symmetry and Spectroscopy”, S. Koinis.

Laboratory website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/CHEM231

Prerequisites: In order to register for this Laboratory course, students must have completed the exercises in the General and Inorganic Chemistry I and Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory courses.

Course content: 1. 2D and 3D drawing of molecules. Recognition of symmetry elements. Graphs of spectra and determination of specific characteristics using specialized software. 2. NMR Spectroscopy in Inorganic Chemistry. Measurement and study of 1H and 31P NMR spectra. 3. Measurement and study of the IR and Raman spectra of simple inorganic ionic compounds. Bands of characteristic groups. Spectral study and structural prediction based on symmetry and IR and Raman active vibrations. 4.  Preparation of samples, recording and study of vibration spectra of inorganic coordination compounds. The effect of coordination on the IR and Raman spectra. 5. Study of the structure of coordination and organometallic compounds, using symmetry elements as well as chemical and spectroscopic data.

Grading policy: The successful completion of the course depends on the following: a) careful and successful completion of the experimental work, b) the appropriate presentation and assessment of experimental data in the laboratory notebook, c) the average grade (≥5) of the two examinations during the course (30% of the final grade). In each examination, the students are examined on the corresponding unit, after its completion in the laboratory. In the case that a student has completed the experimental work but the grade is lower than 5, it is possible for the student to take an exam on both units, during the September exams. In the case that a student has not passed the laboratory exam, the student must re-register for the course and then she/he can re-take the written examinations during the course. There is no examination during the January-February exams.

Course materials in Greek: Instructors’ laboratory notes.

 
302. NUMERICAL METHODS AND PROGRAMMING (elective*, 4 lecture hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM142/

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the course “Introduction to Computing – Applications in Chemistry”

Course content: Part I: Programming. Introduction: Historical review, computer structure, software. Introduction to C programming language: the structure of a program in C, C’s alphabet, declarations, assignment operators, logical expressions, basic input-output functions. Simple programs. Selection commands. Repetition commands. Functions: Functions returning a single value, defining parametric functions, Indicators, call by value, call by reference. Numerical data. Matrices, data structures. Text files, Binary files

Part II: Numerical Methods. Topics on error analysis. Numerical solution of non-linear equations (fixed point method, Newton-Raphson method). Numerical methods for linear systems (direct and iterative). Numerical methods for the calculation of eigenvalues-eigenvectors. Interpolation (Lagrange, divided differences). Least squares method. Numerical differentiation. Numerical integration. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.

Laboratory: Programming in C (2 groups, 2 hours/week)

Course material in Greek: 1) Numerical Analysis: An algorithmic approach, Ν. Misyrlis, 2009. 2) Introduction to C programming language, Ν. Misyrlis, 2006.

*This course was required for students entering the Department up to and including the 2013-14 academic year.

 
501. MODERN TOPICS IN CELL BIOLOGY (elective, 3 lecture hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://multimedia.biol.uoa.gr/fusiko-ximiko.htm

Course content: Origin and evolution of organisms. Cell organization. Research methodology. Structure and function of a standard cellular system. Biological membranes – functional separating layers. The first step in the flow of genetic information – levels of DNA organization. Second step in the flow of genetic information – protein synthesis. Post-translational modification – screening of protein targeting and cellular polarity. Cellular energy production and conversion organelles: mitochondria and chloroplasts. Biomolecule conversion and breakdown organelles: peroxisomes and lysosomes. Cell fibrils and cytoskeleton. Supramolecular structure selfassembly – viruses and phages. Principles of signal transduction. Cellular communication and cell junctions. Extracellular substances. Cell cycle – reproduction, cloning, cell senescence. Cellular transformation – carcinogenesis. Programmed cell death – apoptosis.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Cell Biology”, M. Loukas, K.& N. Litsas Publ. 2) “Cell Biology – Molecular Approach”, B. Marmaras, M. Lampropoulou, Typorama Publ. 3) “The Cell: A Molecular Approach”, G.M. Cooper, R.E. Hausman, I. Basdara and Co. Academic Publ.


 

4th Semester
 
414. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits )

Course website: (a) http://jupiter.chem.uoa.gr/pchem/courses/414/ (b) http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM105

Course content: Thermodynamic systems. Internal energy. Work. Heat. Laws of Thermodynamics: Zero-th, 1st, 2nd, 3rd. Equilibrium conditions. Fundamental equations. Equations of state. Maxwell equations and applications. Phase equilibria in one-component systems: chemical potential dependence on pressure and temperature, Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Phase equilibria in multi-component systems: Colligative properties, Raoult’s law, Henry’s law.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Physical Chemistry. Basic Consideration”, Katsanou. Papazisis Publ. 2) “Physical Chemistry”, P. W. Atkins and J. de Paola, University of Crete Publ.

 
422Θ. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II  (required, 5 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 8 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM123/

Course content: Alcohols and phenols, ethers and epoxides, thiols and sulfides, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, conjugated π systems, aromatic compounds, aromatic substitution reactions, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives.

Course materials in Greek: «Organic Chemistry, Vol. IΙ», David Klein, 1st edition, Greek Translation, Utopia Publishing, Athens, 2015.

 
433. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY ΙΙΙ (required, 4 hours/week, 4 laboratory hours/week, 9 ECTS credits)

Course website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM129/

Course content: Electronic configuration and magnetic properties of transition elements. Theories of metal complexes. Electronic spectra of metal complexes. Introduction on organometallic chemistry and metal clusters. Introduction on mechanisms of inorganic reactions and bioinorganic chemistry of transition elements. Photochemical reactions of transition elements. Catalysis. Τransition element groups (triads).

Course material in Greek: 1) “Inorganic Chemistry”, C. Housecroft, A. Sharpe, edited by N. Hadjiliadis (UNIBOOKS IKE) 2014, 2) “Inorganic Chemistry, 4th edition”, J.E. HuheeyE.A. KeiterR.L. Keiter, editions M. Parikou and Co., 2011.

Laboratory website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM253/

Prerequisites: In order to be enrolled, it is necessary to have completed the laboratory courses of General and Inorganic Chemistry I, and Inorganic Chemistry II.

Course content: 1) Magnetochemistry: Synthesis of complex Hg[Co(SCN)4]. Determination of the magnetic susceptibility of solid compounds. 2) Synthesis of complexes trans– and cis-[Co(en)2Cl2]Cl. Spectrometric kinetic study of cistrans isomerization in methanolic solution. 3) Study of the electronic spectra of complexes [Cr(H2O)6]3+, [Co(H2O)6]2+, [Ni(H2O)6]2+ and [Co(ΝH3)6]3+ in aqueous solutions.

Grading policy: The successful completion of the course depends on the following: a) careful and successful completion of the experimental work, b) the appropriate presentation and assessment of experimental data in the laboratory notebook, c) the average grade (≥5) of the three examinations during the course, which is the final grade of the course. In each examination, the students are examined on the corresponding unit, after its completion in the laboratory. In case a student has completed the experimental work but the examination grade is lower than 5, it is possible for the student to take an exam on all three units, during the September exams. There is no examination during the June exams.

Course materials in Greek: “Laboratory course of Inorganic Chemistry III”, Lecture notes and presentations from the e-class.

 
415. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS II (required, 4 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM213/

Course content: Spectrometric techniques. Introduction to optical methods of analysis. Molecular absorption spectrometry, ultraviolet and visible spectrometry and applications. Lambert-Beer’s law, photometric error. Spectrometric titrations. Molecular Luminescence Spectrometry (molecular fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence). Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Atomic Emission Spectrometry (Flame Atomic Emission Spectrometry, Inductively Coupled Plasma–Atomic Emission Spectrometry). Atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS, ICP-MS, LC-MS, GC-MS). Theory of chromatographic separations. Liquid Chromatography, instrumentation (chromatographic columns, detectors). Liquid Chromatographic techniques: HPLC, Ion Chromatography, Size Exclusion chromatography. Supercritical fluid chromatography and extraction. Kinetic and enzymatic analytical methods.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Principles of Instrumental Analysis”, Skoog, Holler, Crouch, 2) “Instrumental Analysis, Th.P. Chatziioannou, M. Koupparis.

Laboratory website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM213/

Prerequisites: “Analytical Chemistry Laboratory” (213Π).

Laboratory course content: Spectrometric determination of manganese in steel. Flame emission spectrometric determination of alkali and alkaline earth elements. Determination of zinc in insulin preparations by atomic absorption spectrometry. Determination of quinine in tonic water by Fluorescence. Determination of analgesics in pharmaceutical formulations by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Kinetic determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity.

Grading policy: A compulsory written examination takes place after the completion of the laboratory experiments, which results in a grade (A). In addition, the “laboratory performance” of each student is evaluated by the instructor of each laboratory team for a second grade (B), taking into account (i) the successful oral test during the experiments, (ii) the careful and successful completion of the experiments, and (iii) the critical presentation and evaluation of experimental results. Both grades should be ≥5/10. The final Laboratory Grade is calculated by the formula: (A+B)/2. Students, who have completed successfully all the laboratory experiments but fail to achieve passing grades, have the possibility to participate in an examination during September exams.

Course materials in Greek: Instructors’ laboratory notes


 

5th Semester
 
514. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (required, 4 hours/week, 5 laboratory hours/week, 10 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM198/

Course content: Microscopic description of molecular motion. Random motion. Distribution functions. Kinetic theory of gases, equipartition of energy. Molecular collisions, transfer phenomena. Reproduction of thermodynamics via Statistical Ensembles. Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics. Interactive systems. Chemical equilibrium. Macroscopic system computer simulation via Monte Carlo Stochastic processes and Molecular Dynamics.

Course materials in Greek: “Physical Chemistry”, P. W. Atkins and J. de Paola University Publications of Crete.

Laboratory course content: Thermodynamic properties of gases (Joule-Thomson coefficient). Phase equilibria (mutual solubility of liquids, partition coefficient, enthalpy of vaporization). Interphase equilibria (surface tension, physisorption). Solutions (partial molar volume, ionic strength, activity coefficient, molar mass determination via ebullioscopy), boiling point diagrams (azeotrope systems), thermochemistry (enthalpy of neutralization reaction).

 
 422Π. ΟRGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (required, 0 hours/week, 10 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Laboratory website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM172/

Laboratory course content: Synthesis of organic compounds corresponding to representative chapters of theoretical courses Organic Chemistry I and II. In particular: nucleophilic aliphatic substitution following SN1 and SN2 mechanisms, haloform reaction, electrophilic aromatic substitution, nucleophilic addition to a carbonyl group, rearrangement, esterification, Grignard reaction. Isolation of natural product. Column chromatography.

Course materials in Greek: «Laboratory Exercises», Laboratory of Organic Chemistry

Grading policy: At regular intervals during laboratory courses, two compulsory written examinations take place which result in an average grade (A). In addition, the “laboratory performance” of each student is evaluated by the instructor of each laboratory team for a second grade (B), taking into account (i) the careful and successful completion of laboratory experiments, (ii) the critical presentation and evaluation of experimental results and (ii) the theoretical and practical knowledge which are evaluated by written or oral tests during the course. The final Laboratory Grade is calculated by the formula: (A+B)/2. Students who fail to achieve an average grade >5/10, have the possibility to participate in examinations determined by the laboratory.

 
526Θ. ΟRGANIC CHEMISTRY III (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM130/

Course content: Carbonyl condensation reactions. Carbonyl alpha-substitution reactions. Aliphatic amines. Arylamines and phenols. Carbohydrates. Amino acids, peptides and proteins. Lipids. Heterocyclic compounds and nucleic acids. Molecular orbitals and pericyclic reactions.

Course materials in Greek: «Organic Chemistry» Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves and Stuart Warren, Part I, 1st Edition (translation in Greek), Utopia Publishing, Athens, 2016

 
528. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM126/

Course content: Basic concepts of polymer chemistry. Polymer nomenclature. Polymer classification. Homopolymers and copolymers. Structure and microstructure. Size and shape. Average molecular weights of polymers. Polymerization reactions. Step-growth polymerization. Radical, anionic and cationic polymerization. Polymer synthesis with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Size exclusion chromatography. Viscometry of dilute solutions. Membrane osmometry. Vapor pressure osmometry. Static light scattering.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Synthetic Macromolecules. Basic Consideration” A. Dontos, Kostarakis Publ., Athens 2006, 2)“Polymer Science and Technology”, K. Panagiotou, Pegasus Publ., Thessaloniki 2006, 3) Instructors’ notes.

 
533. GROUP THEORY – PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND APPLICATIONS (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM178/

Course content: Group Theory. Wavefunctions and point group representations. Valence Bond Theory (hybrid orbitals). Projection operators. Symmetry adapted linear combinations. Molecular Orbital Theory. The direct product. Vibrational representations of linear molecules. The symmetry of the eigenfunctions of the harmonic oscillator. Overtones and combination bands. Symmetry aspects of Ligand Field Theory. Applications of symmetry to the study of d-d transitions.

Photochemistry and applications. Fundamental laws of Photochemistry. Electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. Beer-Lambert law, selection rules and spectral band intensities. The Frank-Condon principle. Jablonski diagrams. Fluorescence – Phosphorescence. Relaxation pathways (Vibrational relaxation, intersystem crossing and internal conversion, Dissociation/Photodissociation). Lifetime of excited states. Stern-Volmer diagram. Electron and energy transfer, short and long range mechanisms. Triplet state sensitization. Excited states: chemical activity, acidity, redox potentials, molecular orbitals etc. Basic principles of Photocatalysis. Applications in synthesis, energy and medicine. Modern experimental methods for the study of dynamic processes of photochemical reactions.

Course Materials in Greek: 1) Instructors’ notes, 2) “Basic Inorganic Chemistry (3rd edition)”, cotton, Wilkinson, Gauss, translated in Greek (Parisianou Publ.), 2015, 3) eBook “Molecular Symmetry and Group Theory”, M. Sigalas, N. Charistos, L. Antonoglou (Kallipos Programme ESPA) 2015

 
529. ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/PPP146/

Course content: Introduction to the course. Part A: – Economy and Finance – Macroeconomic Models – The Laws of Supply & Demand – Basic Accounting Principles – The Time Value of Money – Investment Evaluation – The Chemical Industry. Part B: Marketing and Strategy – Marketing – Human Resources Management – Business Strategy – Business Strategy in the Present – Introduction to Entrepreneurship. Epilogue.

Course materials: Instructors’ notes.

 
502. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING – COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/PPP146/

Course content: Definition, subject and history of Cognitive Psychology. Research methods of cognitive psychology (experimental, neuroimaging, simulations, artificial intelligence, etc.). Biological bases of cognitive processes. Information-processing Theory. Knowledge and representation (semantic representations: semantic features, semantic networks, propositional, schematics, scenarios). Analogical Representations: New Images, Mutual Models. Cognitive functions of attention, perception and memory. Organization of information in memory.

Course materials: Roussos, P. L. (2014). “Cognitive Psychology: The basic cognitive processes”, Athens: TOPOS.

Attention: The course examination (given in the Spring semester) is announced by the School of Philosopy Rectorate and takes place in auditoriums of the School of Philosophy.

 
602. HISTORY OF NATURAL SCIENCES (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM263/

Course content: The course aims to introduce students to the basic topics of history and historiography of modern science. It begins with an overview of the Scientific Revolution and continues with the episodes that marked the emergence and establishment of science from the 17th to the late 19th century: Chemical Revolution, the transition from force to energy and the emergence of modern physics, the transition from the History of Earth to Geology, Darwinism and the emergence of modern Biology, Electromagnetism and the theories of ether, etc. The course focuses on the events and the intellectual context of each period, but also on the methodological problems related with the ways historians reconstruct past scientific “discoveries” and the creation of new disciplines.

Course materials: 1. Bowler, Peter J., and Iwan Rhys Morus. 2005. Making modern science: a historical survey. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [Greek translation]. 2. Gillispie, Charles Coulston. 1960. The Edge of objectivity: an essay in the history of scientific ideas. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. [Greek translation]


 

6th Semester
 
614. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III (required, 4 hours/week, 5 laboratory hours/week, 10 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://jupiter.chem.uoa.gr/pchem/courses/614/

Course content: The need for a quantum interpretation of the matter. Schrödinger equation and its application to systems that are solved exactly. Mathematical foundations of quantum theory, operators and theorems. Angular momentum, spin, the Pauli principle. Coupling of angular momenta. H atom. Approximate methods. Many electron atoms. Chemical bond.

Course materials in Greek: “Molecular Quantum Chemistry”, P.W. Atkins

Course content: Electrochemical equilibrium (galvanic cells, standard reduction potential, activity coefficient, thermodynamics of galvanic cells. Solubility product, redox titrations.) Ion transport (conductivity, transport numbers.) Dynamical electrochemistry (electrolysis, overpotential, diffusion current.) Chemical kinetics (rate of a reaction, activation energy). Molecular structure and intermolecular interactions (spectroscopy). Radiochemistry (rate of de-excitation of radioactive nuclei, Geiger-Muller counter, absorption of β-radiation). Computational Chemistry.

 
632. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM166/

Course content: General object and branches of Environmental chemistry. Environmental pollution: Pollutant sources, categories and transport. Ecological principles and environmental parameters. Carbon cycle: Greenhouse effect, ocean acidification. Dissolved oxygen and pollution by wastewater. Nutrients – eutrophication. Trace metals (copper, mercury, lead, cadmium, chromium, nickel, zinc etc.). Petroleum products, oil spills, polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Plant protection products (insecticides, fungicides, pesticides etc). Synthetic organic compounds (PBCs, detergents, ΤΒΤ – tributil tin, phenols). Chemical substances management – the REACH regulation. Litter – microplastics. Radioactive pollution. Pathogenic microorganisms. Atmospheric pollutants: carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, ozone. Atmospheric suspended particles. The ozone hole. Atmospheric pollution in urban regions (London, Los Angeles, Athens). Indoor pollution: workplace and residential spaces.

Calculation of final grade: An optional bibliographic study may be performed, the grade of which increases that of the written examination provided it exceeds 5.

Course materials in Greek: 1) Scoullos Μ., Siskos P.: «Environmental Chemistry», Symmetria Publ., 2) Fytianos Κ., Samara-Konstantinou Κ.: «Environmental Chemistry», University Studio Press Publ., 3) Ibanez G. J., Hernandez-Esparza M., Doria-Serrano C., Fregoso-Infante A., Singh Mono M.: «Environmental Chemistry», Foundation for Research and Technology – Crete University Press Publ., 4) Girard E.J.: «Principles of Environmental Chemistry», Parisisanos Publ.

 
626. FOOD CHEMISTRY (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM150/

Course content: Food Science, Food Chemistry in general, Food in general, Water, Carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, Fats and oils and other lipids, vitamins, minerals. Desirable and not food ingredients, chemical additives, pigments, flavor and odor. Food of animal and vegetable origin, Non alcoholic and alcoholic Beverages, Digestion, Food Poisoning, New Foods.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Food Chemistry” G. Zampetakis, C. Proestos, P. Markaki. Stamoulis Publications, Athens, 2014, 2) Instructors’ notes.

 
627. BIOCHEMISTRY I (required, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website:https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM245/

Course content: 1. Introduction to basic biochemistry. Structural elements of biomolecules: amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, fatty acids, nucleic acids. 2. The relationship between structure and function in protein molecules. 3. Higher organization of biomolecules. Composition, organization and function of cell membranes. Membrane transport. Structure of chromosomes. 4. Enzymes and co-enzymes. Mechanism of enzyme action. Enzyme kinetics. Regulation and inhibition of enzymatic reactions. Applications in medicine and other sciences. 5. Basic principles of metabolism. Glycolysis, glyconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Biochemistry” R. H. Garrett, C. M. Grisham, 2) “Lehninger Principles in Biochemistry” D. L.Nelson, M. Cox

 
526Π. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY ΙΙΙ LABORATORY (required, 0 hours/week, 10 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Laboratory website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM203/

Prerequisites: Completion of all laboratory exercises and reports for the 422Π Organic Chemistry II Laboratory course.

Course content: Synthesis of organic compounds. Lectures and exercises on the interpretation of spectral data (NMR, IR, MS) of unknown organic compounds. Qualitative analysis of known and unknown organic substances. Molecular graphics with PyMol. Theoretical calculations of lipophilicity, charge, free energy minimization, conformation analysis and binding of organic compounds to molecular receptors. Bibliographic exercise: A subject is assigned to each student during the semester and students submit a written report after being trained in the use of scientific databases (Reaxys, SciFinder, Scopus, Espacenet, e.t.c.) electronic management of bibliography, text editors (MS Office, Open Office e.t.c.) and chemical structure editors (MarvinScetch, ChemDraw, AccelrysDraw, e.t.c.).

Grading policy: As described for 422Π.

Course materials in Greek: (1) “Organic Structures from Spectra” L.D. Field, S. Sternhell, J.R Kalman, H.L. Li, A.M. Magill, 1st edition, Greek translation, Utopia Publishing, Athens 2016. (2) «Laboratory exercises», Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

 
633. ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMISTRY (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM204/

Course contents: General properties of organometallic compounds. The metal-carbon and metal-hydrogen bond. Complexes with π-type ligands. Oxidative addition and reductive elimination reactions. Insertion and elimination reactions. Nucleophile and electrophile insertion and elimination reactions. Homogeneous catalysis. Metal-carbene and metal-carbyne complexes, metathesis and polymerization. Organometallic chemistry of the main group elements (Ge, Sn, Pb etc.). Organometallic compounds of the transition metals. Applications in organic synthesis. High oxidation state organometallic chemistry. Characterization methods of organometallic compounds. Literature search and selected examples of high impact molecules, from the field of organometallic chemistry.

Outline: Inert atmosphere and vacuum line techniques. Synthesis, purification and spectroscopic characterization of Ferrocene. Laboratory exercises take part before the end of the Semester.

Grading policy: The final grade is calculated as follows: 20% from the laboratory exercises and 80% from the written final exam.

Course material in Greek: (1) “Chemistry of the Organometallic Compounds” A. Christofides, (Ed. Ziti) 2008. (2) “Basic Organometallic Chemistry”, Haiduc, Zuckerman (Ed. Papazissis SA) Athens, 1987. 3) Instructors’ notes.

 
628. POLYMER SCIENCE (elective, 3 hours/week, 3 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM128/

Course content: Anionic polymerization, living radical polymerization. Cationic polymerization. Catalytic polymerization. Introduction to macromolecular architecture. Polymer chain configuration and flexibility. θ-conditions. Amorphous and crystalline polymers. Thermal transitions (melting temperature/crystallization temperature, glass transition temperature).

Laboratory course content: Polymer synthesis by radical and living radical polymerization. Kinetics of step-growth polymerization. Polymer characterization by size exclusion chromatography and dilute solution viscometry in a capillary tube. Determination of the glass transition temperature and melting/crystallization temperature.

Grading policy: Separate exams for the lecture and laboratory courses. The final grade results 30% from the laboratory exercises and 70% from the lecture exam.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Synthetic macromolecules. Basic Consideration”, A. Dontos, Kostarakis Publ. Athens, 2006 2) “Polymer Science and Technology”, K. Panagiotou, Pegasus Publ., Thessaloniki, 2006 3) Instructors’ notes.

 
6210. ORGANIC COMPOUND SPECTROSCOPY AND MOLECULAR MODELING (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM208/

Course content: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Identification of organic molecules and biomolecules using single and two-dimensional liquid state techniques. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the rational design of innovative drug molecules. Principles of Solid State NMR Spectroscopy. The use of other spectroscopies (IR, UV, CD, Raman, X-ray crystallography and MS) in the identification of organic compounds and biomolecules. Examples of applications of spectroscopies where their complementarity is demonstrated in the identification of organic compounds and biomolecules. Applications of Molecular Modeling in Conformational Analysis and Molecular Binding of Bioactive Molecules.

Course materials in Greek: 1. “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance” Th. Mavromoustakos, A. Tzakos, G. Spyroulias, E. Mikros, A. Kolokouris, K. Papakonstantinou, I. Gerothanasis, I. Matsoukas, Symmetria Publ., 2019 ΙSΒΝ 978-960-266-504-6

 
603. INTRODUCTION TO PEDAGOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/PPP303/

Course content: 1. Clarification of basic pedagogical concepts: Conceptual approach to the basic concepts of Pedagogy, such as: Education, Instruction, Culture, Learning, Teaching, Behavior and Training. 2. General objectives of teaching and learning objectives: Modern approaches to general learning objectives. What is a learning objective and how is it defined. The use of learning objectives. 3 Learning to teach and teaching: A brief overview of the theories of knowledge and learning. Teaching methods. Forms of teaching. Techniques and means. Teaching pathways. Evaluation system. 4. The nature of scientific concepts, scientific method, modeling and the experimental approach: 5. Recent theoretical approaches: Modern theories of learning and teaching scenarios. 6. Evaluation: Modern approaches to evaluation where formative assessment is favored over cumulative or final evaluation. 7. Motivation, reward, punishment: Types of motivation, their use in education, rewards, punishments. 8. Classroom management: Students with learning issues, dyslexia, attention deficit syndrome, delinquent behavior, bullying.

Course materials: 1) “Cognitive Psychology and Teaching: Jean Piaget’s Contribution to Modern Pedagogical and Didactical Thought”, A. Koutsoukos, Z. Smyrnaiou, Herodotus Publ., Athens 2007, 2) “Learning and Teaching. Vol 2. Teaching Theory, Practice and Evaluation”, M. Kassotakis and G. Flouris, Athens 2006

 
515. CHEMICAL INSTRUMENTATION  (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM215/

Prerequisites: Instrumental Analysis Ι (313).

Course content: Measurement domains. Systems, units. Unit quality characteristics (input, output, transfer). Transducers. Semiconductors (diodes, transistors and basic circuits). Solid state optical (photoresistors, photovoltaic cells, photodiodes, array detectors, CCD). Analogue circuits. Operational amplifiers, potentiostats, galvanostats. Operational amplifier circuits with various transducers (temperature, pressure, optical). Piezolectric transducers. Digital circuits (Bool theorems, gates, decoders, time circuits, counters). Digital-to-analogue and analogue-to-digital converters. Typical digital measurement instruments. Signals and noise. Types of noise and noise measurments. Spectral (Fourier) signal representation. Filters (low-pass, high-pass, band-pass). Lock-in amplifier and boxcar integrator. Software methods for noise reduction. Structure and operation of microprocessors. Machine language. Computer peripherals. Computer interfacing to measurement and automation systems. Examples of control programmes.

Laboratory course content: Measurement of input and output impedance of various units. Operational amplifier circuits (followers and adding amplifiers), potentiostat and galvanostat. R-C filters. Thermistor applications. Applications of logarithmic amplifier. Basic computer interfacing to measurement systems.

Course materials in Greek: 1. “Chemical Instrumentation – Microcomputers”, K. Efstathiou 2) “Principles of Instrumental Analysis”, Skoog, Holler, Crouch


 

7th Semester
 
739. SPECIAL ISSUES IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM131/

Course content: Cluster chemistry. Clusters of p-, d- and f-groups. Multiple metal-metal bonds of transition elements. Synthesis and characterization, bond and structure interpretation, chemical reactivity and properties. Applications in synthesis – Advanced materials. Metal-organic polygons and polyhedrons, metal-organic frameworks: synthesis, structure and properties. Bioinorganic Chemistry. Metal ions in biological systems – Biogeochemical cycles. Interaction of metal ions with polynucleotides and nucleic acids. Metal complexes as drugs and diagnostics. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions in biological systems. Biomimetic materials, biocatalysis and biocatalysts.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Bioinorganic Chemistry” D.P. Kesisoglou, G. Psomas (Ziti Pelagia & Co. Ltd.) 2010. 2) “Bioinorganic Chemistry” R. W. Hay (Papazisis AEBE) 1992.

 
715. CURRENT ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM165/

Prerequisites: Instrumental Analysis I (313), Instrumental Analysis II (415)

Course content: Current chromatographic techniques, selected spectroscopic techniques (ICP, XRF, etc), Non-destructive analytical techniques, hyphenated analytical techniques, thermal analytical techniques, mass spectroscopy.

Course materials in Greek: Instructors’ notes

 
717. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY IV (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: –

Prerequisite Course: Physical Chemistry III (614)

Course Content: General formalism of Angular Momentum, Angular Momentum and Spatial Rotations, Addition of Angular Momenta, Spin, Approximation Methods for Bound States (Perturbation theory, Variation Method, Methods for time-dependent Problems), Interaction of Quantum Systems with external Electric and Magnetic Fields, and with Electromagnetic Radiation.

Course Materials in Greek: Molecular Quantum Mechanics (by P. W. Atkins), Papazisis Publ.

 
818. RADIOCHEMISTRY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM199/

Course content: Introduction. Historical overview. Nuclear Chart. Radioactive decays. Forces in nature. Particle classification: Fermions/Bosons. Radius of the nucleus, density distribution, mass, binding energy. Bethe-Weizsacker equation. Nuclear stability. Q-value of nuclear processes. Spontaneous and non-spontaneous processes. Fermi gas model. Independent particle approximation. Introduction to the nuclear shell model. Magnetic moment of the nucleus. Principles of NMR and ESR. Radioactive decay law. Half-life. Interaction of (nuclear) radiation with matter. Heavy ions: Bethe-Bloch equation. Interaction of fast electrons with matter. Interaction of gamma radiation with matter. Compton Scattering. Photoelectric Effect. Pair production. Charged particle detectors. Photon detectors. Sources of natural radioactivity. Radioactivity units. Nuclear Fission. Nuclear reactors. Accelerators. Nuclear reactions. Synthesis of the chemical elements in the universe and the stars. Medical applications: imaging and therapy.

Laboratory Exercises: Types of detectors and characteristics of their pulses. Gas ionization detectors. Scintillation detectors (inorganic crystals, plastic scintillators). Semiconductor detectors (silicon, germanium). Electronic devices: Oscilloscope. Pulse generators. Preamplifier. Amplifier. Time measurement systems. Data Acquisition systems. Geiger-Muller Counter. NaI(Tl) detector. Gamma-ray spectrum characteristics. Silicon surface-barrier detector. Alpha spectroscopy. Statistics of nuclear measurements.

Course materials in Greek: Instructor’s notes.

 
7216. MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website:http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM138/

Course content: Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. General approaches in the discovery of drugs and pharmaceuticals. Design and development of drugs. Receptors. Drug interactions with receptors. Enzymes and enzyme inhibitors. DNA and drugs that interact with DNA. Prodrugs and drug delivery systems. Selected drug categories.

Course materials in Greek: 1. Medicinal Chemistry notes by Prof. G. Kokotos, 2. Organic Chemistry vol II, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves Stuart Warren, Translated in Greek, Utopia Publishing, Athens 2016.

 
7219. ASSESSING FOOD QUALITY AND FOOD SAFETY (elective, 3 hours/week, 6 laboratory hours/week, 9 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM101/

Prerequisites: (1) Analytical Chemistry (213), (2) Food Chemistry (626).

Course content: Methods of food analysis, quality control principles, specifications, legislation, sampling, HACCP, microscopic food control.

Laboratory course content: Analysis of milk, flour, honey, oil, cheese, juice. Determination of aromatic compounds with GC and pigments by HPLC. Organoleptic properties of juice and yoghurt. Determination of total phenolics in wine spectrophotometrically. Determination of antioxidants in foods.

Course materials in Greek: 1) C. Proestos, P. Markaki “Food: Quality Control, Safety and microbiology”, 2017. Da Vinci Publications, 2) Instructors’ Notes for the laboratory exercises.

 
7220. FOOD MICROBIOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 6 laboratory hours/week, 9 ECTS credits)

Course website:http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM134/

Prerequisites: Food Chemistry (626).

Course content: Microorganisms classification. Factors that affect microbial growth in food. Microorganisms associated with food. Foodborne agents causing illness. Food conversions (Food spoilage and Fermentations)

Laboratory course content: Microscopic observation of microorganisms. Microorganism stains (Gram and simple).Assay of bacteria in milk. Coliform test in water. Microscopic and cultural characteristics of molds isolated from food of plant origin. Identification of microorganisms in food.

Maximum number of students = 35.

Course materials in Greek: 1) C. Proestos, P. Markaki “Food: Quality Control, Safety, and Microbiology”, 2017. Da Vinci Publications, 2) Instructors’ Lecture Notes 3) Instructors’ Laboratory Notes.

 
738. CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM162/

Prerequisites: Students may enrol in the course, provided they have passed the following courses: Environmental Chemistry (632) and Analytical Chemistry (213) or Instrumental Analysis ΙΙ (415).

Course content: The object of chemical oceanography. Historical review. Water distribution on the Earth – the hydrological cycle. Introduction in physical, biological and geological oceanography (marine ecosystems, marine sediments, ocean circulation). Fresh vs sea water: the effect of electrolytes on the structure and properties of water molecules. The formation, evolution, composition and stability of the oceans. The ocean as a chemical system (water, particulate matter, sediments). Chemical elements and their speciation in the marine system. Chemical processes, balances and reactions. Photosynthesis and life cycle in the sea. Dissolved gasses in seawater. Nutrients and the cycles of nitrogen, phosphorus and silica. Basic characteristics of surface and ground waters. Lakes, lagoons, wetlands, rivers and estuaries.

Laboratory content: Aims and purposes of oceanographic research. Sampling and in situ measurement techniques. Basic analytical determinations in marine waters: Salinity/Chlorinity, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (nitrogen species – nitrites, nitrates, ammonium, organic nitrogen, phosphates, silicates), Chlorophyll content, Organic carbon in sediments. Visit to the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR).

Calculation of final grade: Examinations include subjects related both to theory and laboratory work. Laboratory performance is calculated at a percentage equal to 15%. An optional bibliographic study may also be performed, the grade of which increases that of the written examination provided it exceeds 5.

Course materials in Greek: 1) Scoullos M.: “Chemical Oceanography”, Symmetria Publ., 2) Sakellariadou F.: “Chemical Oceanography”, Stamouli A.E. Publ., 3) Dassenakis E., Karavoltsos S., Ladakis E., Paraskevopoulou V.: “Chemical Oceanography”, Kallipos Publ. (https://repository.kallipos.gr/handle/11419/4683) A.E. Publications.

 
737. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM163/

Prerequisites: Students may enrol in the course, provided they have passed the following courses: Environmental Chemistry (632) and Analytical Chemistry (213) or Instrumental Analysis ΙΙ (415).

Course content: Structure and characteristics of the atmosphere. Basic principles of meteorology. Emissions, transport and transformation of pollutants in the atmosphere. Mechanisms of atmospheric reactions. Aerosols and suspended particles. Emphasis on the chemical behavior of air pollutants. Secondary pollutants. Application of models in atmospheric pollution. Programs for pollution confrontation. Indoor pollution (sick building syndrome). Methods for the determination of pollutants in emissions from stationary sources. Automatic methods for monitoring atmospheric pollution.

Laboratory course content: Atmospheric particles. Determination of metals (lead). Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Determination of ions. Determination of BTEX. Automatic analyzers. Determination of dioxins. Visit to Democritus Research Centre.

Calculation of final grade: : Examinations include subjects related both to theory and laboratory work. Laboratory performance is calculated at a percentage equal to 15%. An optional bibliographic study may also be performed, the grade of which increases that of the written examination provided it exceeds 5.

Course materials in Greek: 1) Lazaridis Μ.: “Atmospheric Pollution with Meteorology Elements”, Tziola Publ., 2) Karathanasis S.: “Atmospheric Pollution”, Tziola Publ.

 
7211. WINE AND ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 3 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM133/

Prerequisite courses: (1) Analytical Chemistry (213). (2) Instrumental analysis Ι. Due to the limited number of laboratory places (90), if the number of registered students is higher than 90, the number of completed course units by each student will be taken into consideration.

Course contents: Global economic geography of wine. Greek vine varietals. Must composition and correction. Alcoholic fermentation. Production of different types of wine. Specialized wine treatments. Wine-related legislature. Wine tasting. Beer brewing, wine distillates, alcoholic beverages (whiskey, rum, vodka, brandy, ouzo, gin, etc. Fermentation microbiology.

Laboratory course content: Analyses of wine and must ingredients. Analyses of beer, wine distillate and alcoholic beverage ingredients. Microscopic observation of fermentation yeast, their isolation and culture.

Grading policy: A separate exam is given in the laboratory section of the course, and the resulting overall grade, which also takes laboratory performance into consideration, corresponds to 40% of the combined grade.

Course materials: 1) In Greek «Oenology. Science and Expertise” Volumes I and II. Soufleros. E. Soufleros Publ., Thessaloniki, 1977, 2) Greek Translation of “Drinks” A. Varnam, I. Sutherland, by Stella Parikou &Co Ltd, Ion Publ., Athens 2006, 3) Instructor’s notes. 4) Instructors’ laboratory notes.

 
7222. SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLYMERS (elective, 3 hours/week, 3 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM132/

Course content: Copolymer morphology. Effect of composition and architecture on morphology. Copolymer micellization in solution. Introduction to integrated circuits. Optical lithography. Lithographic materials. Lithographic processes. Ion lithography. Synthesis of materials with defined dimensions and shape at the nanometer level.

Laboratory course content: Lithography. Production of micellar solutions. Determination of micellar molecular weight and degree of aggregation by static light scattering. Determination of micellar hydrodynamic radius by dynamic light scattering. Determination of the micellar viscometric radius by dilute solution viscometry.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Synthetic Macromolecules. A Basic Consideration”, A. Dondos. Kostaraki Publ. Athens, 2006. 2) “Polymer Science and Technology”, K. Panagiotou, Pegasus Publ., Thessaloniki 2006, 3) Instructors’ notes, 4) Instructors’ laboratory notes.

 
7213. BIOCHEMISTRY II (elective, 3 hours/week, 5 laboratory hours/week, 8 ECTS credits)

Course website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM235/

Course Content: 1. Basic principles of molecular biology. DNA replication, transcription and translation. 2. Transcription regulation and post-translational modifications. 3. Protein sorting and transport. 4. Specialized cellular pathways. Protein degradation. Protein secretion. Signaling pathways. 5. Molecular motors.

Laboratory course content: Α) Tutorials: Theory of basic laboratory techniques. Basic biochemistry procedures for the purification and analysis of biomolecules. Use of cellular and animal models. Introduction to molecular biology techniques. Β) Laboratory practicals: A. Protein analysis (cell culture, cell homogenization, differential centrifugation, SDS-PAGE electrophoresis). B. Molecular biology (E.coli culture, genomic DNA isolation, transformation of E.coli cells with plasmid DNA, agarose electrophoresis).

Grading policy: The lecture course grade counts for 70% of the final grade, and the laboratory grade counts for 30%. The grades from both courses must be passing.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Biochemistry” J. Μ. Berg, J. L. Tymoczko, L. Stryer 2) “Molecular Biology of the Cell” B. Alberts, A. Johnson, J. Lewis, D. Morgan, M. Raff, K. Roberts, P. Walter, J. Wilson, T. Hunt.

 
7214. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM118/

Prerequisites: Analytical Chemistry (213), Instrumental Analysis I (313), Instrumental Analysis II (415), Biochemistry Ι (627)

Course content: Basic principles of laboratory practice in Clinical Chemistry. Biological specimen collection. Statistical concepts in Clinical Chemistry: determination of reference limits and estimation of reference range values. Assurance of quality control in the clinical lab. Automation in Clinical Chemistry. Biochemical Analyzers. Basic principles of electrophoretic techniques in Clinical Chemistry. Basic principles and applications of immunoassays. Enzymes in Clinical Chemistry. Basic principles of Clinical Enzymology. Proteins in serum. Electrolytes and blood gases. Cardiac function: Lipids, lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and other cardiac factors. Endocrinology, hormones and assessment of thyroid function. Diabetes Mellitus. Assessment of kidney function. Assessment of liver function. Tumor markers. Therapeutic drug monitoring. Introduction to Molecular Diagnostics. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Real time PCR, quantitative PCR, RT-PCR, ARMS-PCR, multiplex PCR. DNA Sequencing, next generation DNA sequencing technologies. Mutation analysis. Molecular tumor biomarkers. Companion diagnostic tests.

Laboratory course content: Safety rules in the clinical chemistry lab. Handling of clinical specimens. Isolation of plasma and serum from whole blood. Serum deproteinization. Enzymatic determination of Glucose in plasma, serum and whole blood. Enzymatic determination of urea in plasma and serum. Protein electrophoresis in serum. Biochemical analyzers (visit to a Hospital Clinical Chemistry laboratories). Immunoassays (ELISA). Isolation of DNA from whole blood. PCR amplification of BRCA1: Detection of 5382insC mutation in blood. Agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR products. Real time PCR.

Grading policy: One exam on the lecture and laboratory material. The Laboratory grade counts for 25% of the final grade.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Clinical Chemistry:, William Marschall 2) “Clinical Biochemistry”, Gow A., R. Cowan, D. O’ Reilly, M. Stewart, J. Shepherd, Parisianou Publ. 3) Instructor’s notes

 
8210. INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL PROCESSES (elective, 3 hours/week, 3 laboratory hours/week, 7 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM136/

Course content: Raw materials for industrial chemical processes. Green chemistry and sustainable chemistry. Industrial catalysis: homogenous, heterogenous, enzymatic, basic concepts. Unit Processes: Cracking and pyrolysis processes. Hydrogenation processes: hydrogenation of aromatic compounds, olefins, renewable raw materials and nitrogen. Dehydrogenation processes. Reactions in the presence of water as a reagent: production of synthesis gas and butadiene hydrodimerization. Processes with synthesis gas: methanol production and olefins hydroformylation. Processes with carbon monoxide: methanol carbonylation to acetic acid and alternating copolymerization of olefins with carbon monoxide to polyketones. Oxidation processes: olefin oxidation, ethylene epoxidation to ethylene oxide, ethylene oxidation to acetaldehyde and cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol/cyclohexanone for polyamides (nylon) production. o-Xylene oxidation to phthalic anhydride and p-xylene oxidation to terephthalic acid for the production of poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET. Ammoxidation of propylene to acrylonitrile and oxidation of SO2 to SΟ3 for the production of sulfuric acid. Alkylation processes for the production of intermediates in the synthesis of vitamin E. Isomerization, transesterification, metathesis, polymerization and dehydration processes.

Laboratory course content: Catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene over Fe2O3/Cr2O3/K2CO3. Optimization of conditions with the Simplex method. Ziegler-Natta catalysts: polymerization of ethylene with TiCl4/AlR3. Olefin hydrogenation catalyzed by RhCl(PPh3)3. Catalytic reforming of naphtha – Platforming process. Olefin hydrogenation catalyzed by RhCl[P(C6H4m-SO3Na)3]3. Oxidation of ethylene – Wacker process.

Grading policy: The combined grade results from two separate exams, one in the lecture course and one in the laboratory course. Laboratory performance accounts for 30% of the grade.

Course materials in Greek: 1) G. Papadogianakis “Unit Processes – Notes for Industrial Chemical Processes”, 2) G. Papadogianakis “Notes for the Industrial Chemical Processes Laboratory course, 3) “Industrial Organic Chemistry” S. Pegiadou-Koemtzopoulou, E. Tsatsaroni, I. Eleutheriades, Gartagani Publ. Thessaloniki, 2008.

 
719. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://jupiter.chem.uoa.gr/pchem/courses/719/

Course content: Aspects of light and spectra. Types of spectroscopy: atomic, rotational, vibrational, electronic, (nuclear) magnetic resonance: Energy levels, selection rules, spectral patterns. Spectroscopy techniques and setups.

Course materials in Greek: “Modern Spectroscopy”, M. J. Hollas, Wiley.

 
703. MATERIALS CHEMISTRY (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM212/

Course content: Crystal structure and crystallography. Structure of solid and mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Non-crystalline materials; ceramic materials (oxides, carbides, nitrides, borides) including optical inorganic materials and conductive inorganic materials (insulators, semiconductors, conductors). Nanoparticles. Complexes – catalysts (mono-, di- and polynuclear complexes). Optical materials including photosensitizers. Biomimetic materials including complexes with applications in medicine (e.g. MRI agents, radiofrequency materials) without drugs. Metal-Organic Frameworks, Metal-Organic Polyhedrons and Polygons. Magnetic materials (metal clusters, molecular magnetic materials and magnetic refrigerators). Allotropic forms of carbon (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene nanoribbons, other allotropic forms of carbon): symmetry, aromaticity, physicochemical properties, chemical reactivity, synthesis, derivatization methods, derivatives, characterization, applications. Carbon nanodots: synthesis, properties, applications. Supramolecular chemistry, molecular recognition, inclusion complexes and host-guest interactions, organic materials for transfer of drug substances, molecular engines, nanoreactors, nanoparticles and other related nanostructures. Polymeric nanoparticles a. Nanoreactors b. Nanocontainers and c. Nanocarriers formed from pure polymeric materials. Nanocomposites (Hybrid) Materials: a. Polymeric/Inorganic Nanoparticles (Au, Ag, SiO2, CdSe, CdTe, Fe3O4, Fe2O3) b. Polymers/Plane Inorganic Substrates (clay, mica) c. Polymer/Allotropic forms of carbon (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene nano-films).

Course materials in Greek: 1) Atkins and Paola, Physical Chemistry, Chapter 19. 2) West, Solid State Chemistry and its Applications 3) Materials Chemistry, B.D. Fahlman, 2011, Springer. 4) Instructors’ notes.

 
Undergraduate Thesis (required, 7 ECTS credits)
 

 

8th Semester
 
838. INORGANIC CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website:http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM200/

Course content:  General considerations of inorganic chemical technology. Industrial production (primary and secondary) of inorganic materials (inorganic acids, fertilizers, building materials, cements, glasses, ceramics, etc.). Minerals, metals and alloys. Mineral carbons. Recycling and waste management processes. Educational visit to a production unit.

Course materials in Greek: “Inorganic Chemical Technology”, A. Sdoukos, F.I.Pomonis (Tziola Editions) 2010

 
816. QUALITY CONTROL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE – ACCREDITATION (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM226/

Prerequisites: (1) Instrumental Analysis Ι (313), (2) Instrumental Analysis ΙΙ (415).

Course content: Introduction in quality systems (ISO, EN). Quality assurance in testing and calibration laboratories. Laboratory Accreditation Regulations and Criteria (ISO 17025). Calibration and control of analytical instruments and devices. Development of Analytical Methods. Validation and verification of analytical methods. Uncertainty estimation. Traceability of measurements. Chemical Metrology. Sampling and Applications. Laboratory accreditation – procedural guidelines. Case Studies.

Course materials in Greek: Instructors’ notes.

 
8213. TOPICS IN BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM127/

Course content: Sugars, glucals, deoxysugars, cyclitoles, aminosugars. Sugar conformation analysis, anomeric effect (1H, 13C NMR, Karpluss equation, magnetic anisotropy). Sugar protecting groups. Methods for O– and N-Glycoside synthesis. Synthesis of heterocyclic compounds. Nucleosides, nucleotides, nucleic acids. Amino acids, amino acids synthesis, peptides, strategies in peptide synthesis, protecting groups, orthogonal protection, coupling reagents, solution and solid-phase peptide synthesis, side reactions, racemization. Proteins, levels of protein structure, tertiary structure, protein synthesis, disulfide bridge, cystine peptides. Reactions of heterocyclic compounds, an introduction.

Course materials in Greek: (1) “Organic Chemistry, Vol. II”, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves and Stuart Warren, 1st edition, Greek translation, Utopia Publishing, Athens 2016. (2) Lecture Notes.

 
718. CHEMICAL KINETICS  (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: https://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM225

Course content: Chemical reaction rate. Reaction order. Reaction mechanisms. Chemical reaction theories. Transport phenomena. Effect of temperature on reaction rate. Chemical reactions in dense phases. Influence of pressure and ionic force on reaction rate. Adsorption and reactions on surfaces. Photochemical reactions. Enzyme kinetics.

Course materials in Greek: “Physical Chemistry”, P. W. Atkins and J. de Paola, University Publications of Crete.

 
8218. FOOD TECHNOLOGY (elective, 2 hours/week, 3 laboratory hours/week, 5 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM115/

Prerequisites: (1) Analytical Chemistry (213). (2) Food Chemistry (626).

Course content: Food Industries Introduction, food preservation methods, food packaging, food hygiene, Biotechnology principles.

Laboratory course content: Food Technology and Food Biotechnology Exercises, food preservation techniques and methods that affect shelf life of food and its nutritional value.

Course materials in Greek: 1) “Food Technology” by Nasopoulou, K., Nicolaou, S. and Zambetakis I., Ath. Stamoulis publications, Athens, 2010.

 
8121. TOXICOLOGY – ECOTOXICOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM229/

Prerequisites: Students may enrol in the course, provided they have passed the following courses: Environmental Chemistry (632) and Analytical Chemistry (213) or Instrumental Analysis ΙΙ (415).

Course content: (Α) Toxicology – Environmental Toxicology: brief historical evolution and their role in risk assessment due to environmental pollution. Circulation of toxic substances and medicines in the organism (absorption, distribution, biotransformation, excretion). Mechanisms of detoxification. Toxicokinetics, toxicity tests, security – danger relations. Toxicological data for dangerous chemicals (toxic gases, alcohols, medicines, toxic substances existing in industrial, agricultural, domestic and working environment, foodstuffs, risk assessment). Sources of exposure, mechanism of toxic activity, therapeutic treatment. Toxicological analysis for specific categories of substances (drugs, alcohol, dopping). The most significant factors responsible for health problems and security matters of employees in the working environment. (Β) Ecotoxicology: Basic principles and concepts. Bioaccumulation – biomagnification. Ecological risk assessment. Organisms – Bioindicators and substances – biomarkers in toxicological research. Characteristic examples of ecotoxicological consideration of environmental problems. Toxicological tests in aquatic ecosystems: microcosms, mesocosms and field studies. Presentation of research techniques in the field of Toxicology – Ecotoxicology.

Calculation of final grade: An optional bibliographic study may be performed, the grade of which increases that of the written examination provided it exceeds 5

Course materials in Greek: 1) Hourdakis K.: “Human Toxicology”, University Studio Press Publ., 2) Reichl F.X.: «General Toxicology – Substances, activity, environment», Broken Hill Publ.

 
836. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website:  http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM167/

Prerequisites: Students may enrol in the course, provided they have passed the following courses: Environmental Chemistry (632) and Analytical Chemistry (213) or Instrumental Analysis ΙΙ (415).

Course content: (Α) The need for environmental management and various management perceptions. The concept of “sustainable development”. Principal terms – definitions in environmental management. Environmental management tools (institutional, financial, technological etc). Levels of environmental management – sectors, organizations. International conventions, legislation. Evolution of the management since 1950. Environmental monitoring. Environmental impact studies. Examples of good and bad management practices. (Β) Environmental Technology: Wastes vs Environment. Management and treatment of wastes-wastewaters: Primary, secondary and tertiary treatment. Management of activated sludge. Solid waste management – land filling. Technologies of treatment, incineration, recycling, composting of solid wastes. Technologies for the confrontation of marine and atmospheric pollution. Technologies for the remediation of polluted areas.

Laboratory content: Environmental monitoring programs. Samplings – in situ measurements. Determinations: BOD/COD, ammonium, trace metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr(VI) etc.) organic pollutants (phenols, detergents etc.). Microbial infection of water. Quality control of environmental monitoring results – accreditation of environmental laboratories. Visit to the Sewage Treatment Plant of Psyttalia.

Calculation of final grade: Examinations include subjects related both to theory and laboratory work. Laboratory performance is calculated at a percentage equal to 15%. An optional bibliographic study may also be performed, the grade of which increases that of the written examination provided it exceeds 5.

Course materials in Greek: 1) Liberatos G., Vagenas D.: “Management of Liquid Wastes”, Tziola Publ., 2) Albanis T.: “Pollution and Technologies for Environmental Protection”, Tziola Publ.

 
8212. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (elective, 0 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 0 ECTS credits)
Not offered in the 2018-19 academic year
 
8211. PETROLEUM AND PETROCHEMICAL CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY (elective, 3 hours/week, 2 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM137/

Course content: Petroleum and natural gas reserves. Petroleum refineries. Physical processes: distillation, deasphalting with liquid propane, etc. Chemical processes: Thermal cracking and pyrolysis of asphalt (visbreaking, delayed coking, flexicoking). Catalytic cracking, hydrotreating, hydrocracking, catalytic reforming, alkylation, isomerization and polymerization. Refinery gas stream processing. Elemental sulfur recovery (Claus process). Steam cracking for the production of basic materials in the petrochemical industry such as ethylene, propylene, etc. Processes for the production of petrochemical intermediates. Production of alternative fuels from non-renewable resources: gasoline production from methanol (MTG pathway, methanol to gasoline). Gasoline production by the Fischer-Tropsch pathway. Hydrogen production by catalytic steam reforming. Liquid fuels production from renewable biomass. Biorefineries. 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation biofuels production.

Laboratory course content: Quality control (flash point, vapor pressure, aniline point, pour point, etc.) of petroleum products

Grading policy: Separate exams for the lecture and laboratory courses. The final grade results from 30% from the laboratory grade and 70% from the lecture exam, with the prerequisite that both grades are passing.

Course materials in Greek: 1) G. Papadogianakis “Notes for Petroleum and Petrochemical Chemistry and Technology”, 2) A. Kioulafa “Notes for the Petroleum and Petrochemical Chemistry and Technology Laboratory course”, 3) “Petroleum Chemistry and Technology”, N.A. Nikolaou, Vivlioekdotiki, Thessaloniki, 2002.

 
8221. CONTEMPORARY METHODS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM210/

Course content: Hyperconjugation, resonance, aromaticity, acidity-basicity-pKa, reaction energy diagrams, Hammond postulate, Curtin-Hammett principle, alkane conformations, cycloalkane conformations, mechanistic studies in organic chemistry (trapping of intermediates, Hammett equation, kinetic isotope effects), C-C bond formation with organometallic reagents (Grignard reagents, carbanions), basic principles and reaction patterns of transition metal catalysts, coupling reactions in organic synthesis (Buchwald-Hartwig, Mizoroki-Heck, Sonogashira, Migita-Stille, Suzuki-Miyaura, Tsuji-Trost), olefin metathesis (ring-closing metathesis and cross-metathesis reactions), named reactions and common oxidation and reduction reactions, modern synthetic approaches for the stereoselective formation of alkenes, modern synthetic approaches for the synthesis and ring opening of epoxides, 1-2 vs 1,4 addition, sigmatropic and other rearrangements, nucleophilic addition on carbonyl compounds, diastereoselective nucleophilic addition on carbonyl compounds (Felkin-Anh model, Cram-chelation model, Zimmerman-Traxtler transition states), asymmetric synthesis with chiral auxiliaries, catalytic asymmetric synthesis, Organocatalysis (origin, historic overview, enamine activation, iminium ion activation, activation via hydrogen bonding).

Course materials in Greek: 1. Organic Chemistry, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves and Stuart Warren, Volume II, 1st edition, Greek Translation, Utopia Publishing, Athens, 2016. 2. Instructors’ notes.

 
803. VITICULTURE (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: –

Course content: Vine-growing. Wine products. Vine morphology-anatomy. Pruning. Annual vegetation cycle. Fertilization. Harvest

Course materials in Greek: “Viticulture”, M.N. Stavrakakis, Tropi Publ.

 
720. POLYMERS: MATERIALS FOR NEW APPLICATIONS (elective, 3 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 4 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM217/

Course content: Polymers on surfaces (theory, synthesis, characterization, properties, applications). Self-healing polymers (synthesis, characterization, properties, applications). Conductive polymers for photovoltaic devices. Polymeric sensors. Polymeric photonic crystals.

Course materials in Greek: “Polymer Chemistry” P. C. Hiemenz, T. P. Lodge, Translation: S. Vratolis, H. Kakoulidis, Th. Prevedoros, Edit. Spyros Ch. Anastasiadis, University of Crete Publ., Crete 2014.

 
701. TEACHING CHEMISTRY (elective, 4 hours/week, 0 laboratory hours/week, 6 ECTS credits)

Course website: http://eclass.uoa.gr/courses/CHEM257/

Course content: 1. LEARNING THEORIES AND CHEMISTRY EDUCATION: A. Behaviorism and constructivism, Piaget, Vygotsky, Ausubel, Information-processing Theory, students’ alternative conceptions, Conceptual Change. B. Students’ alternative conceptions about chemical concepts (atomic and molecular structure, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, neutralization, redox). 2. SCIENCE EDUCATION CONCEPTS: Nature of scientific concepts, scientific method / inquiry, modeling and creativity. The development of scientific concepts (psycho-pedagogical approach), steps of the scientific method (observation, hypothesis, hypothesis testing, etc.), use of ICT in the educational process, creativity. 3. CHEMISTRY AS TEACHING SUBJECT: A. The history of Chemistry as a framework of analysis based on Jensen’s scheme. Johnstone’s three levels of Chemistry and students’ difficulties. B. Macroscopic level, C. Submicroscopic level, D. Symbolic Level, E. Linking the three levels. 4. TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY: A. Chemistry curricula. B. Teaching approaches (applications of learning theories in chemistry teaching, analogies, concept maps, problem solving, inquiry approach). C. Assessment during teaching of Chemistry (teaching objectives – taxonomy, higher-order cognitive skills). 5. New theoretical approaches: Teaching scenarios. 6. CLASSROOM PSYCHOLOGY.

Course materials: 1) “Science Education”, P. Kokkotas (Gregory Pub.). 2) “Physics and Chemistry Education Topics in Secondary Education:, G. Tsaparlis (Grigori Pub.).

 
Undergraduate Thesis (continued)  (required, 7 ECTS credits)
 

*Οι πιστωτικές μονάδες των μαθημάτων αυτών δεν προσμετρούνται στον απαιτούμενο αριθμό πιστωτικών μονάδων για τη λήψη πτυχίου.